Australian Institute of Criminology

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DUMA 2001 annual report

Media Release

23 April 2002

The Australian Institute of Criminology released its Drug Use Monitoring in Australia (DUMA) 2001 Annual Report today.

The DUMA program at the Australian Institute of Criminology tests recent use of illicit drugs by those apprehended by police. Using urinalysis the program ensures the most accurate data on recent drug use patterns is obtained. It provides unique data on patterns of drug use, local drug markets, criminal activity and treatment.

DUMA allows local police to monitor the impact of illicit drugs on their streets with high quality data. Such data enable police, policy makers and criminal justice practitioners to systematically assess and evaluate their street level drug markets.

DUMA information is also affiliated with a number of similar international drug use monitoring programs in the United States, England, South Africa, Chile and Malaysia, which allows Australia to benchmark information against similar countries overseas.

Releasing the report today, the Director of the Australian Institute of Criminology Dr Adam Graycar outlined some of the key findings from the 2001 DUMA report:

  • 60 percent of adult males arrested for a property offence tested positive to an illicit drug, excluding cannabis
  • 45 percent of adult males arrested for a violent offence tested positive to an illicit drug, excluding cannabis
  • Over half report that they had been arrested on a prior occasion in the past 12 months
  • 21 percent report that they had served time in prison during the past 12 months
  • Across all sites, DUMA detected a decrease in percent testing positive to opiates, with significant decreases in the Sydney sites of Bankstown and Parramatta
  • DUMA detected an increase in the percentage testing positive to cocaine in the Sydney sites of Bankstown and Parramatta
  • DUMA detected an increase in the percentage testing positive to amphetamines in Southport and East Perth.

DUMA is funded by the Federal Attorney Generals' Department, the South Australian Attorney Generals' Department and with 'in-kind' assistance from the NSW, SA, WA and QLD police. The authors of the 2001 Annual report are AIC Director of Research, Dr Toni Makkai and Ms Kiah McGregor.