Australian Institute of Criminology

Skip to content

Data on community corrections and periodic detention

The SCRCSP Report on Government Services includes data on community corrections, with details of the average number of offenders on restricted movement orders, reparation orders and supervision orders for each jurisdiction for the period 2003–08 (SCRCSP 2009a). Table 2 sets out the average number of Indigenous females serving each order in 2007–08, by jurisdiction. The most common order was a supervision order, with 82 percent serving such an order. New South Wales, Western Australia and Queensland accounted for 83 percent of supervision orders and 80 percent of all Indigenous females serving a community corrections order.

Table 2: Indigenous females on community corrections orders, by type and jurisdiction, 2007–08
JurisdictionRestricted movement orderReparation orderSupervision orderDaily number serving distinct order
NSW 3 133 661 748
Vic 0 33 50 80
Qld 0 139 557 659
SA 6 61 149 216
WA 6 223 387 485
Tas 0 11 21 29
NT 2 26 91 113
ACT 0 1 21 22
Total 17 627 1,937 2,352

Source: Adapted from SCRCSP 2009a

Figure 2 sets out the number of females serving community corrections orders in 2007–08 by jurisdiction and Indigenous status. As can be seen, Indigenous women account for a minority of females serving such orders in all jurisdictions except the Northern Territory, where they account for 88 percent of females serving a community corrections order. Indigenous women are particularly under-represented on such orders in Victoria, where they account for only six percent of females serving a community corrections order.

Figure 2: Daily average number of females serving a community corrections order by Indigenous status and jurisdiction, 2007–08

 Daily average number of females serving a community corrections order by Indigenous status and jurisdiction, 2007–08

Source: Adapted from SCRCSP 2009a

The SCRCSP report also includes data on periodic detention, which is currently only available in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory (SCRCSP 2009a). These data indicate that periodic detention is only rarely used in the Australian Capital Territory, but that Indigenous women are especially unlikely to receive such an order. Between 2003 and 2008, the numbers for Indigenous women ranged from 0.3 to one, compared with three to five non-Indigenous women being on such orders. In New South Wales, there were seven to 10 Indigenous women on periodic detention between 2003 and 2008, compared with 57–63 non-Indigenous women (SCRCSP 2009a: Tables 8A.27 and 8A.65).