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Australian Capital Territory

The ACT student sample

The calculation of victimisation rates along international students in the Australian Capital Territory is complicated by small numbers and in all cases (for assault) the number of records was statistically unreliable. As a result, the findings presented in this section are limited to descriptive only as a comparative analysis will be neither accurate nor meaningful.

Between 2005 and 2009 inclusive, 6,721 international students from five source countries were identified as having commenced study at an institution or course located in the Australian Capital Territory (see Table 78). This includes students who commenced study prior to 2005, but were known to be continuing their studies in the Australian Capital Territory in 2005. Overall, the Australian Capital Territory accounted for two percent of all international students studying in Australia between 2005 and 2009.

The vast majority of students studying in the Australian Capital Territory were from the People's Republic of China (n=4,111; 61%), followed by India (n=817, 12%), Malaysia (n=740, 11%), the United States (n=573, 9%) and the Republic of Korea (n=480, 7%).

Over the five year period, the number of international students studying in the Australian Capital Territory remained relatively stable, except in 2009 when the number of students increased by a total of almost 400 students (up 31% on the previous year). This overall increase in students in 2009 was largely driven by a significant increase in the number of students from China; up 38 percent on the previous year.

Table 78: Annual student arrivals by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
 Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesTotal
2005 103 462 46 57 16 684
2006 95 365 60 81 48 649
2007 121 316 53 70 55 615
2008 119 396 30 65 56 666
2009 152 493 36 109 53 843
Total 590 2,032 225 382 228 3,457
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesTotal
2005 20 472 50 62 10 614
2006 23 390 68 78 83 642
2007 55 297 66 71 88 577
2008 58 364 27 68 88 605
2009 71 556 44 79 76 826
Total 227 2,079 255 358 345 3,264
All students
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesTotal
2005 123 934 96 119 26 1,298
2006 118 755 128 159 131 1,291
2007 176 613 119 141 143 1,192
2008 177 760 57 133 144 1,271
2009 223 1,049 80 188 129 1,669
Total 817 4,111 480 740 573 6,721

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Estimating the 'at-risk' student population

For the reasons described in the Methodology section, the calculation of victimisation rates required a reliable estimate of the 'at-risk' population in each year and for each of the five international student source countries; in this case, a summary estimate of the number of students who studied within the Australian Capital Territory for an entire 365 days in each year. It is calculated as the sum of the number of days all students were 'at risk' within the relevant year, divided by 365. These estimates were notionally larger than those presented above because students were not only counted in the year in which they arrive, but also counted in any subsequent years of study.

Overall, the distribution of 'at-risk' students is roughly equal with the distribution among students arriving in the Australian Capital Territory between 2005 and 2009 (see Figure 20).

Figure 20: Annual student arrivals and estimated annual at-risk population by country of birth, Australian Capital Territory (%)

Figure 20: Annual student arrivals and estimated annual at-risk population by country of birth, Australian Capital Territory (%)

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Finally, the last column presented in Table 79 provides comparative population estimates for the annualised ACT population aged between 15 and 44 years. These estimates are derived from the ABS population census projections and are used as the basis for which statewide victimisation rates are calculated (with the exception of the other theft category).

The international student groups arriving to study in the Australian Capital Territory were not homogenous, varying significantly by both gender and age. In terms of gender, just over half of all students arriving in the Australian Capital Territory were male (51%); however, males arriving from India substantially outnumbered female arrivals over the five year period (72% vs 28%). Conversely, female students typically outnumbered males arriving from the United States (60% vs 40%) and the Republic of Korea (53% vs 47%). The gender differential was roughly equal for students arriving from the People's Republic of China (51% vs 49%) and Malaysia (48% vs 52%).

These patterns were also generally consistent for the calculated annual 'at-risk' populations, where in 2009 for example, male students from India made up 70 percent of the total Indian 'at-risk' population and female students from the People's Republic of China comprised half of the Chinese 'at-risk' population.

In terms of age, the vast majority of all students were aged between 20 and 35 years. In 2009, this age group comprised 91 percent of 'at-risk' students from India, 83 percent of students from the United States, 75 percent from the People's Republic of China, 73 percent from Malaysia and 64 percent from the Republic of Korea. Younger students (those aged between 15 and 19 years) were disproportionally over-represented among those from the Republic of Korea (26%), the People's Republic of China (25%) and Malaysia (22%) when compared with India (9%) and the United States (8%).

Even more telling is the joint age and gender distribution for each country in 2009, with as many as 39 percent of all 'at-risk' students from India and 36 percent of all 'at-risk' students from Malaysia being males aged between 20 and 24 years (see Table 80). By contrast, the single age/gender combination with the highest proportional population of 'at-risk' students was, for all remaining countries, females aged 20 to 24 years.

Finally, it is important to note the comparative differences in age and gender for each international student group when compared with the ACT population. Specifically, 50 percent of the ACT population aged between 15 and 44 years was male. Two-thirds of the population (combined and separate for male and female populations) were aged over 25 years; one-third were aged over 35 years. Only 17 percent of 15–44 year old population in Australian Capital Territory was aged between 20 and 24 years—substantially lower than students from Malaysia (63%), the People's Republic of China (62%), the United States (61%), India (56%) and the Republic of Korea (46%).

Table 79: Estimated annual at-risk population by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09 (n)
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population
Total at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year persons
2005 25,107 69 106,251 291 12,355 34 14,873 41 4,025 11 n/a 76,083
2006 53,612 147 248,628 681 32,033 88 42,265 116 18,621 51 n/a 76,360
2007 74,181 203 298,247 817 45,338 124 57,461 157 23,805 65 n/a 76,987
2008 95,208 261 361,090 989 50,367 138 72,116 198 23,717 65 n/a 77,609
2009 117,088 321 450,130 1,233 54,444 149 92,655 254 25,780 71 n/a 78,252
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population
Total at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year persons
2005 5,460 15 107,535 295 12,731 35 16,015 44 2,624 7 n/a 75,766
2006 11,769 32 252,166 691 35,924 98 42,616 117 24,489 67 n/a 76,001
2007 23,156 63 304,217 833 50,833 139 58,944 161 34,433 94 n/a 76,517
2008 39,065 107 361,084 989 58,582 160 69,015 189 31,801 87 n/a 77,032
2009 52,367 143 447,767 1,227 58,880 161 81,213 223 27,733 76 n/a 77,557
All students
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population
Total at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year personsTotal at-risk daysTotal full-year persons
2005 30,567 84 213,786 586 25,086 69 30,888 85 6,649 18 n/a 151,849
2006 65,381 179 500,794 1,372 67,957 186 84,881 233 43,110 118 n/a 152,361
2007 97,337 267 602,464 1,651 96,171 263 116,405 319 58,238 160 n/a 153,504
2008 134,273 368 722,174 1,979 108,949 298 141,131 387 55,518 152 n/a 154,641
2009 169,455 464 897,897 2,460 113,324 310 173,868 476 53,513 147 n/a 155,809

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Table 80: Age distribution of the annual at-risk population by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2009a
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population
Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%
15–19 yrs 30 10 300 24 40 30 48 19 6 9 12,341 16
20–24 yrs 182 57 748 61 52 40 169 67 31 47 13,731 18
25–34 yrs 104 32 175 14 32 24 30 12 24 36 27,072 35
35–44 yrs 4 1 8 1 8 6 7 3 6 9 25,108 32
Total 320 1,232 132 254 66 78,252
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population
Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%
15–19 yrs 13 9 314 26 34 23 55 25 6 8 11,710 15
20–24 yrs 78 54 771 63 78 52 131 59 54 73 13,444 17
25–34 yrs 52 36 129 11 28 19 32 14 11 15 26,501 34
35–44 yrs 1 1 10 1 10 7 3 2 3 4 25,902 33
Total 143 1,224 150 222 74 77,557
All students
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population
Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%Total full-year persons (n)%
15–19 yrs 43 9 614 25 74 26 104 22 12 8 24,051 15
20–24 yrs 260 56 1,518 62 130 46 300 63 85 61 27,175 17
25–34 yrs 155 34 304 12 60 21 62 13 35 25 53,573 34
35–44 yrs 5 1 19 1 18 6 10 2 9 6 51,010 33
Total 463 2,456 281 476 140 155,809

a: Totals may include students aged outside of the specified age ranges and therefore may not sum

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Experience of assault

Rate of assault victimisation

Comparison of assault data presented in this chapter with that of any other jurisdiction is not advised. Assault data is not collected or recorded consistently between the jurisdictions, thus significantly limiting the reliability of cross-jurisdictional comparisons. It is for this reason that national comparisons are not provided in this report.

Between 2005 and 2009, the estimated rate of assault for males across the Australian Capital Territory ranged from between six and seven incidents per 1,000 of the population. The highest occurred in 2007. For females, the rate of assault ranged between five and six incidents per 1,000 of the population.

Due to the small number of assaults recorded for males and females across the student groups, the findings in this section focus on male students from India and the People's Republic of China.

The rate of assault among Chinese male students was lower than the average for similarly aged males across the Australian Capital Territory from 2005 to 2009, although this was not statistically significant. For Indian males, the rate of assault was higher than that for males in the Australian Capital Territory in 2006 and 2009, although this was not statistically significant (see Table 81).

The rate of assault was higher for male Indian students compared with students from China from 2006 to 2009, although due to the wide confidence intervals, these findings do not have a high degree of reliability.

Most assaults for both Indian and Chinese male students occurred on the street or in open spaces (43% and 46%, respectively; see Table 82).

Examination of the temporal factors revealed that most assaults occurred between 8 pm and 4 am and on weekends (Friday, Saturday and Sunday; see Tables 83 and 84).

Table 81: Rate of assault by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population average
nRatenRatenRatenRatenRateRate
2005 0 1 3.4^^ 0 0 0 6.8
(0.1–19.1) (6.7–7.0)
2006 2 13.8^^ 4 5.9^^ 0 0 1 20.3^^ 6.9
(1.7–49.9) (1.6–15.1) (0.5–113.3) (6.8–7.1)
2007 1 5.0^^ 2 2.4^^ 1 18.3^^ 0 0 7.2
(0.1–27.7) (0.3–8.8) (2.2–66.0) (7.0–7.3)
2008 1 3.9^^ 5 5.1^ 0 0 0 6.4
(0.1–21.5) (1.6–11.8) (6.2–6.5)
2009 4 15.6^^ 3 2.4^^ 0 1 3.9 0 6.7
(5.1–36.5) (0.5–7.1) (0.1–21.9) (6.6–6.9)
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population average
nRatenRatenRatenRatenRateRate
2005 0 2 6.8^^ 0 0 0 4.6
(0.8–24.5) (4.5–4.7)
2006 0 0 0 0 0 5.4
(5.3–5.5)
2007 0 1 1.2^^ 0 0 2 0.0^^ 5.7
(0.0–6.7) (0.0–39.8) (5.6–5.9)
2008 0 2 2.0^^ 0 0 0 5.9
(0.2–7.3) (5.8–6.1)
2009 0 2 1.6^^ 2 13.4^^ 0 1 0.0^^ 5.7
(0.2–5.9) (1.6–48.3) (0.0–50.1) (5.6–5.8)

^Estimates with a relative standard error of greater than 25% should be interpreted with caution

^^Estimates with a relative standard error of greater than 50% should be interpreted with extreme caution

(n–n) The numbers in parentheses beneath the point estimates (rates) indicate the lower and upper band confidence intervals

Note: Comparison of this data with that of any other jurisdiction is not advised. Assault data is not collected or recorded consistently between the jurisdictions, thus significantly limiting the reliability of cross-jurisdictional comparisons. It is for this reason that national comparisons are not provided in this report

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Location of assault

Table 82: Location of recorded assaults by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Street/open space 3 43 6 46 0 1 100 0
Residential 0 4 31 0 0 0
Commercial—Retail 2 29 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Hospitality/ entertainment 2 29 2 15 0 0 1 100
Commercial—Financial services 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Other 0 0 0 0 0
Public transport 0 1 8 1 100 0 0
Educational 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0
Total 7 13 1 1 1
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Street/open space 0 2 33 1 50 0 0
Residential 0 3 50 1 50 0 0
Commercial—Retail 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Hospitality/ entertainment 0 1 17 0 0 0
Commercial—Financial services 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Other 0 0 0 0 0
Public transport 0 0 0 0 0
Educational 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 6 2 0 0

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Temporal pattern of assault

Table 83: Time of day of assaults by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Midnight–4 am 2 25 3 20 0 0 0
4 am–8 am 1 13 2 13 0 0 0
8 am–noon 1 13 1 7 0 0 0
Noon–4 pm 1 13 2 13 0 1 100 0
4 pm–8 pm 1 13 1 7 1 100 0 0
8 pm–midnight 2 25 6 40 0 0 1 100
Total 8 15 1 1 1
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Midnight–4 am 0 1 14 0 0 0
4 am–8 am 0 0 0 0 0
8 am–noon 0 1 14 0 0 0
Noon–4 pm 0 1 14 0 0 0
4 pm–8 pm 0 1 14 2 100 0 0
8 pm–midnight 0 3 43 0 0 0
Total 0 7 2 0 0

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Table 84: Day of week of assaults by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Sunday 1 13 3 20 0 0 0
Monday 1 13 4 27 0 0 1 100
Tuesday 2 25 1 7 1 100 0 0
Wednesday 0 2 13 0 0 0
Thursday 0 2 13 0 0 0
Friday 3 38 2 13 0 1 100 0
Saturday 1 13 1 7 0 0 0
Total 8 15 1 1 1
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Sunday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Monday 0 2 29 0 0 0
Tuesday 0 1 14 1 50 0 0
Wednesday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Thursday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Friday 0 0 1 50 0 0
Saturday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Total 0 7 2 0 0

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Experience of robbery

Rate of robbery victimisation

Between 2005 and 2009, the estimated rate of robbery for males across the Australian Capital Territory ranged from between four and five incidents per 1,000 of the population. For females, the rate remained steady at one from 2005 to 2009.

Due to the small number of robberies recorded for males and females across the student groups, the findings in this section focus on male students from the People's Republic of China. The rate of robbery among Chinese students was lower than the average for similarly aged males across the Australian Capital Territory in 2006, 2008 and 2009 (see Table 85). Most robberies for occurred on the street or in open spaces (86%; see Table 86). Examination of the temporal factors revealed that most robberies occurred in the early to late evening (4 pm and midnight; see Table 87) and on Wednesdays (see Table 88).

Table 85: Rate of robbery by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population average
nRatenRatenRatenRatenRateRate
2005 0 0 0 0 0 4.5
(4.4–4.6)
2006 0 1 1.5^^ 0 0 0 4.9
(0.0–8.2) (4.8–5.0)
2007 0 0 0 0 0 5.0
(4.9–5.1)
2008 0 4 4.1^^ 0 0 0 4.3
(1.1–10.4) (4.2–4.4)
2009 1 6.3^^ 2 1.6^^ 0 0 0 3.6
(0.8–22.6) (0.2–5.9) (3.4–3.7)
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population average
nRatenRatenRatenRatenRateRate
2005 0 0 0 0 0 1.2
(1.2–1.3)
2006 0 0 0 0 0 1.3
(1.3–1.4)
2007 0 2 0.0^^ 0 0 0 1.3
(0.0–4.4) (1.2–1.3)
2008 0 0 0 0 0 1.2
(1.1–1.3)
2009 0 1 0.0^^ 0 0 0 0.9
(0.0–3.0) (0.9–1.0)

^Estimates with a relative standard error of greater than 25% should be interpreted with caution

^^Estimates with a relative standard error of greater than 50% should be interpreted with extreme caution

(n–n) The numbers in parentheses beneath the point estimates (rates) indicate the lower and upper band confidence intervals

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Location of robbery

Table 86: Location of recorded robberies by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Street/open space 1 100 6 86 0 0 0
Residential 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Retail 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Hospitality/ entertainment 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Financial services 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Other 0 0 0 0 0
Public transport 0 1 14 0 0 0
Educational 0 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 7 0 0 0
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Street/open space 0 3 100 0 0 0
Residential 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Retail 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Hospitality/ entertainment 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Financial services 0 0 0 0 0
Commercial—Other 0 0 0 0 0
Public transport 0 0 0 0 0
Educational 0 0 0 0 0
Other 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 3 0 0 0

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Temporal pattern of robbery

Table 87: Time of day of robberies by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Midnight–4 am 0 0 0 0 0
4 am–8 am 0 1 14 0 0 0
8 am–noon 0 0 0 0 0
Noon–4 pm 0 0 0 0 0
4 pm–8 pm 0 3 43 0 0 0
8 pm–midnight 1 100 3 43 0 0 0
Total 1 7 0 0 0
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Midnight–4 am 0 0 0 0 0
4 am–8 am 0 0 0 0 0
8 am–noon 0 0 0 0 0
Noon–4 pm 0 0 0 0 0
4 pm–8 pm 0 3 100 0 0 0
8pm–midnight 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 3 0 0 0

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Table 88: Day of week of robberies by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Sunday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Monday 1 100 1 14 0 0 0
Tuesday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Wednesday 0 2 29 0 0 0
Thursday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Friday 0 1 14 0 0 0
Saturday 0 0 0 0 0
Total 1 7 0 0 0
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited States
n%n%n%n%n%
Sunday 0 1 33 0 0 0
Monday 0 0 0 0 0
Tuesday 0 0 0 0 0
Wednesday 0 0 0 0 0
Thursday 0 0 0 0 0
Friday 0 2 67 0 0 0
Saturday 0 0 0 0 0
Total 0 3 0 0 0

Note: Percentages may not sum to 100 due to rounding

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]

Experience of other theft

Rate of other theft victimisation

The ABS was unable to provide age and gender breakdowns for other theft data from Recorded Crime Victims. As a result, the state averages presented for the category of other theft are provided to give some context against which the student rates of other theft may be considered; however, the two are not directly comparable and it is important to exercise caution when interpreting the results.

Between 2005 and 2009, the rate of other theft for all persons across the Australian Capital Territory ranged from between 19 and 21 incidents per 1,000 of the population. Due to the small number of other theft offences recorded for males and females across the student groups, the findings in this section focus on students from India and the People's Republic of China.

There was no statistically significant difference between Indian and Chinese students in the rate of other theft over the period (see Table 89).

Table 89: Rate of theft by gender and country, Australian Capital Territory, 2005–09
Males
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population average
nRatenRatenRatenRatenRateRate
2005 0 3 17.2^^ 0 0 0 20.0
(5.6–40.1) (19.6–20.5)
2006 3 34.5^^ 6 8.8^^ 1 26.4^^ 1 0.0^^ 0 21.2
(11.2–80.6) (3.2–19.2) (3.2–95.3) (0.0–31.9) (20.7–21.7)
2007 4 24.8^^ 13 15.9^ 1 9.1^^ 1 6.4^^ 0 19.3
(8.1–58.0) (8.5–27.2) (0.2–58.7) (0.2–35.4) (18.8–19.8)
2008 3 11.6^^ 18 18.3^ 3 16.3^^ 0 0 19.6
(2.4–33.8) (10.8–28.9) (2.0–58.7) (19.1–20.0)
2009 11 31.3^^ 13 10.6^^ 1 7.6^^ 1 3.9^^ 0 19.4
(15.0–57.5) (5.6–18.0) (0.2–42.4) (0.1–21.9) (19.0–19.9)
Females
IndiaChinaKoreaMalaysiaUnited StatesACT population average
nRatenRatenRatenRatenRateRate
2005 0 2 10.2^^ 0 0 0 20.0
(2.1–29.8) (19.6–20.5)
2006 0 5 7.2^ 0 1 8.6^^ 0 21.2
(2.3–16.9) (0.2–47.7) (20.7–21.7)
2007 1 15.8^^ 10 12.0^ 1 0.0^^ 0 0 19.3
(0.4–87.8) (5.8–22.1) (0.0–28.1) (18.8–19.8)
2008 1 9.3^^ 8 8.1^ 0 1 5.3^^ 0 19.6
(0.2–52.1) (3.5–16.0) (0.1–29.6) (19.1–20.0)
2009 0 6 4.9^^ 2 13.4^^ 0 0 19.4
(1.8–10.7) (1.6–48.3) (19.0–19.9)

^Estimates with a relative standard error of greater than 25% should be interpreted with caution

^^Estimates with a relative standard error of greater than 50% should be interpreted with extreme caution

(n–n) The numbers in parentheses beneath the point estimates (rates) indicate the lower and upper band confidence intervals

Source: AIC, International Student Victims of Crime 2010 [computer file]