Drug-related crime : evidence from the National Drug Strategy Household Survey

As part of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
(AIHW) 2007 National Drug Strategy Household Survey
(NDSHS), respondents aged 14 years and over were asked
whether, in the 12 months prior, they had experienced drug-related victimisation
or were involved in a range of illegal activities while under the influence of
drugs. Drug-relatedness is based on the perceptions of respondents in the
NDSHS and does not necessarily indicate the actual presence
of drug use or intoxication at the time of an incident. The results indicated
that around 11 percent of Australians were verbally abused, eight percent were
made to feel fearful and two percent were physically abused by someone who they
believed was under the influence of drugs (not including alcohol). The
experience of drug-related victimisation was higher than self-reported
involvement in criminal activities, where some three percent of Australians
reported driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of drugs. This was
followed by those who reported verbally abusing someone (1%), causing a public
disturbance (0.6%), damaging property (0.4%) and physically abusing someone
(0.3%). Although these percentages appear small, they are presented as
proportions of the total Australian population aged 14 years and over; one
percent equates to approximately 172,000 people.

Prevalence of drug-related victimisation and perpetration in the past 12 months, Australians aged 14 years and over (percentage)

Source: Adapted from AIHW (2008), Tables 5.1 and 5.2

References

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) 2008. 2007 National Drug Strategy Household Survey: first results. Canberra: AIHW