DNA and criminal justice

Abstract

The papers presented at this conference examine DNA profiling and how it impinges on the criminal justice system. Scientists, lawyers and police explain how this new expert evidence affects their areas of work. Developments such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) are presented, and the problems of quality control are revealed in detail. These matters are of great importance when treating evidence in court.

Proceedings of a conference held 30-31 October 1989

Contents

  • The scientific basis of DNA technology
    Ben Selinger and Ben Magnusson
  • What is involved in producing sound DNA evidence
    Nicola Leaney
  • A view from the bench
    John Phillips
  • DNA profiling: forensic science under the microscope
    Ian Freckelton
  • Bridging the legal-science gulf
    James Taylor Kearney
  • DNA profile evidence and the inference chart concept
    Eric Magnusson and Ben Selinger
  • DNA profiling:¬†standardising the report
    Bently Atchison and Stephen Cordner
  • What authority should police have to detain suspects to take samples
    Steve Ireland
  • Structure of the FBI laboratory
    Kenneth W.Nimmich
  • DNA profiling: the transition from watching brief to the courts - a Victorian perspective
    Tony Raymond
  • DNA profiling: the transition from watching brief to the courts - a Victorian perspective
    David Gidley
  • Fraudulent frozen meat - DNA in action
    Terry Nicholls and Ken Reed
  • Potential sources of artifacts and errors in generating a 'DNA profile'
    Ken Reed
  • The Tracktel electrophoretic pattern image processing system
    Malcolm Hall
  • Macro mini micro satellite VNTR polymorphism: theory and application
    Craig Fowler
  • DNA fingerprinting by PCR amplification of HLA genes
    Simon Easteal